Tag Archives: American Sign Language

Free Printable – Functional Sign Language for the Childcare Setting

Noah has been enjoying his time at the Child Watch program at the Y.   A few weeks ago, the director asked if I could come up with a few signs to share so that Noah would be understood when he signs.  I’ve come up with nine basic American Sign Language signs that are commonly used at home and in the childcare setting; Mommy, Daddy, water, thirsty, all done, more, potty, ball and hurt.

Functional Sign Language for the Childcare Setting

Download the free printable PDF here: Functional Sign Language for the Childcare Setting

For many children with Down syndrome, apraxia, and other speech delay, motivation can be a real problem.  There is nothing more frustrating to a child than attempting to communicate with someone who isn’t understanding them.  On the flip side, there is nothing more motivating to a child struggling with speech than to have the people around him understand and respond to his attempts to communicate.

Please share these signs with your child’s school, babysitter, daycare center, Sunday school class, grandparents, and anywhere else your child may be at risk for not being understood.

Thanks to http://www.babysignlanguage.com for allowing me to use their graphics.

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Noah’s Courage – TMI

Don’t you just hate it when bloggers insist on sharing potty training experiences either out of pride or desperation?  It makes for  just slightly uncomfortable reading, don’t you think?

Well, phooey.  I’m going to do it anyway.

Noah (6 – with Down syndrome) got up from his nap today and I sent him to go potty.  He came back bare bottomed and headed for his underware drawer.  He pulled out a pair and signed “pee pee.”

I said, “Noah, where’s your underware?

He signed “dirty.”

I went and checked – no sign of the clothes.

“Noah, where is your underware?”

He took me to the washing machine, opened the lid, and there they were.

Sure enough his stuff was wet (not dirty).   Kinda strange cuz he never has accidents at nap time anymore.  For goodness sake, he doesn’t even go to sleep at nap time.  But that’s beside the point.

Back to his bedroom – he lead the way.  He put out new underware and shorts and was raring to go.

So, let’s review.

The kid had an accident.

He realized he had an accident.

He knew he needed to shed the old clothes and come get the new.

Not only did he know the clothes needed to go in the washing machine, he actually PUT them in the washing machine.  (Siblings, take note!)

He put the new clothes on all by himself.

And he communicated several times before, after and during this episode, everything from can I get up, to dirty, to I want to watch TV (all in gestures and sign).

It was like, well, a conversation.

Sweeeeeet!

And how about those life skills?  Impressive, eh?

(Don’t tell my other kids about all this – they know I’d be writing a much different post if I was discussing their potty training experiences.)

Breaking Up is Hard to Do

Noah is officially without a speech therapist.    Miss L is the only speech therapist Noah has ever known, and we LOVE her!

The Early Childhood Intervention SLP who came once a month and blew bubbles at Noah doesn’t count.

Miss L. gave Noah his first words, and she knows him inside and out.  She was the kind of therapist who made materials for him in her down time and was always coming up with creative ideas to keep things fresh.  She was in constant contact with his physical therapist, so our hippotherapy sessions not only concentrated on his PT goals, but also his speech goals.  She gave us notice last month, but I kept hoping she’d change her mind and decide to stay at the center where he gets his therapy, which just so happens to be about 20 minutes from our house.

No such luck.

From what I understand, her replacement hasn’t worked with children since grad school.  I met her last week.  She’s young and enthusiastic, but there weren’t any fireworks, if you know what I mean.

I asked the replacement to call me so I could get some details on her experience and training.  Maybe she’ll call tomorrow . . . or not.

I have a line on a clinic in Austin (a good 45 minutes away) where all the SLPs know PROMPT, which is very encouraging.  I’m still waiting to hear if they have experience with apraxia and Down syndrome.  Come to think of it, they’ll also have to know quite a bit of ASL.

In any case, it won’t be Miss L.  Sniff.

I’m not a sentimental kind of person, but this is really hitting me hard.  He’s going to miss Miss L.  I’m going to miss Miss L.

Sigh.