Category Archives: All Letters

Pinned It, Did It – Free Printable Alphabet and Initial Sound Strips for Matching

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DSC08586Let’s for it for not having to reinvent the wheel!

I found these free printable alphabet strips and initial sound strips over on Pinterest from The Toddler House.  Laminated, cut and paired with some alphabet magnets, these strips were the perfect practice tool for matching letter to letter and initial sound to corresponding picture. Noah (6 with Down syndrome) did the letter match, and Bella (4) did the picture/letter match.  For those of you looking for cookie sheet activities – this is perfect.  Noah used our nifty metal door for his background.

Next time we do this, I’m going to take it one step further and write the letters under the pictures in dry erase markers and let Noah use the “hints” to match letter to picture. Learning for these little guys is all about baby steps and modifying activities to match their ability level.

For the original pin, go here: http://pinterest.com/pin/234961305531046225/

For the site with a link to the free printable PDF files, go to http://www.geocities.com/thetoddlerhouse824/abccenters.html.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom – Free Printables

A printable that spans the interest of my 2-year-old, my 4-year-old and my 6-year-old with Down syndrome?

Uh-huh!

Can you say JACKPOT?

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This is a printable palm tree with all the letters of the alphabet in round circles (coconuts).

For the 2-year-old, I called out a letter and pointed to it and he dotted it with a bingo dauber.  As I pointed to it, I would say whether it was at the top of the page, the middle, the left or the right.  The point was just to give him exposure to the use of those words.

For the 4-year-old, I called out a letter and told her approximately where it was on the page, “near the top, near the bottom, in the middle, to the left, to the right, on the trunk.”  Since she already knows all her letters, she could find them on her own, and the use of the prepositions and directions gave her some good practice at these often overlooked words.  She would find the letter and dot it with the bingo dauber.

Noah – 6 with Down syndrome used this as a matching activity.  Before we started, I printed all the letters of the alphabet on some round pricing stickers I had.  I pointed to a letter on the printout, named it and pointed to the area on his sticker sheet where the matching letter was located.  He took off the sticker (yay fine motor skills!) and placed it on the matching letter on the printout.

When he was all finished, he took a bingo dauber and dotted all the stickers.  I don’t know what it is about those bingo daubers, buy my kids LOVE them!

Here’s the link to the free printable alphabet palm trees:

http://www.makinglearningfun.com/themepages/CCBBLetterAssessments.htm.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom – ABCs With An Attitude

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Chicka Chicka Boom Boom was a book I missed out on when I was teaching Trinity (18), Andres (8), Eden (7) and Leah (11) to read.  Fortunately, I’ve caught this unfortunate oversight in time for my Littles – Noah (6 with Down syndrome), Bella (4) and Seth (2).

Actually, I didn’t realize what a treasure it was until I happened across the video version of Chicka Chicka Boom Boom put out by Scholastic.  I watched it once and knew the book would be a forever classic in our home.  Funny how every now and then it’s the movie that makes the book versus the other way around.

If you’re not familiar with the story, it’s about the letters of the alphabet as they make their way up the coconut tree, “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, will there be enough room?”

You’ll have to check it out yourself to find out.

DSC08579So we’re doing a week of Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, complete with alphabet activities, palm trees and coconuts.  We used construction paper, foam letters and glue for this.  It’s difficult to tell, but we fringed the leaves – great practice for Little Miss Scissor-Hands (Bella – 4) and Noah (6 with Down syndrome) too.  I just drew short lines on the edges of the leaves for the kids to cut.  A fun craft project with minimum mess and lots of opportunities to practice fine motor skills and alphabet recognition – who could ask for more?